How to Use Steam Web API with JavaScript

If you are a developer who loves creating applications or websites that incorporate gaming-related features, you are going to want to understand how to use the Steam Web API. The Steam Web API, created by Valve Corporation, provides access to a variety of data and functionality that can help you create an engaging and personalized user experience. In this blog, we'll explore how to use Steam Web API with JavaScript and provide some practical code examples.

Registering for a Steam Web API Key

Before you can use the Steam Web API, you must register for a Steam Web API Key. You can do this via the Steam Community Beta or by visiting the Steam API Keys page. Once you have your key, you can start querying the Steam Web API.

The Steam Web API Interface

The Steam Web API provides several different interfaces for interacting with the API. Some of the most common interfaces include:

  • ISteamUser
  • ISteamApps
  • ISteamNews
  • ISteamPlayerStats

In this blog, we will be working with the ISteamUser interface to retrieve user information.

Retrieving User Information with the Steam Web API

Let's start by retrieving information about a user's Steam profile. To do that, we'll create a URL that includes our Steam Web API Key and the user's Steam ID:

const steamUserId = '76561197960287930'; // Replace with a real Steam ID
const steamApiKey = 'YOUR_API_KEY_HERE'; // Replace with your Steam Web API Key
const url = `http://api.steampowered.com/ISteamUser/GetPlayerSummaries/v0002/?key=${steamApiKey}&steamids=${steamUserId}`;

This URL will retrieve information about the user's Steam profile, including their username, avatar image, status, and the date they last logged in.

Now that we have our URL, we can make an API call to retrieve the data. We can do this using the fetch function in JavaScript:

fetch(url)
  .then(response => response.json())
  .then(data => console.log(data));

This code will make a GET request to the Steam Web API and return the response data as a JSON object.

Using Promises to Handle the Response Data

To make our code more efficient and readable, we can use Promises to handle the response data. Here's an example of how we could use Promises to handle the response data from the previous example:

function getUserInfo() {
  const steamUserId = '76561197960287930'; // Replace with a real Steam ID
  const steamApiKey = 'YOUR_API_KEY_HERE'; // Replace with your Steam Web API Key
  const url = `http://api.steampowered.com/ISteamUser/GetPlayerSummaries/v0002/?key=${steamApiKey}&steamids=${steamUserId}`;

  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    fetch(url)
      .then(response => response.json())
      .then(data => resolve(data))
      .catch(error => reject(error));
  });
}

getUserInfo()
  .then(data => console.log(data))
  .catch(error => console.error(error));

This code defines a function that retrieves user information using the Steam Web API. The function returns a Promise that resolves with the response data or rejects with an error. We can then use getUserInfo() to retrieve user information and handle the response data using .then() and .catch().

Conclusion

In this blog, we've explored how to use the Steam Web API with JavaScript. We've covered how to register for a Steam Web API Key, interact with the API's interfaces, and retrieve user information. Of course, there are many other features and functionalities you can explore with the Steam Web API, but this blog should give you a good starting point. Happy coding!

Related APIs

Public APIs — A directory of free and public apis

Built by @mddanishyusuf